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Cornerstone Surf and Skate Online

CS skate Team?

Written by Raoul van den Berg on .

 

 

The 2014 CSskateTeam has been selected!!

 

 

CSskateTEAM

 

And what a team, diverse in style and personalities...all sharing the same passion.

Shredders of boards of all shapes and sizes.

 

For fear of having them overwhelmed by fans and groupies, we are hiding their identities till we can safely release the first Team video.

 

 Watch this space...

 

 

Raoul Has Lost It ... Sponsor Ramble

Written by Raoul Van Den Berg on .

alt

 

Before I start rambling on, I think it would be best if I give you some background. So you can better understand where I am coming from.

I made Downhill skateboarding my passion the same year that I started racing. That was back in 2009, now it doesn't sound too long ago but if you talking in terms of Downhill skateboarding in South Africa, that is generations ago. When SA had only one store stocking Longboards, and Hot Heels Africa only had 20 something riders competing. That was in total, as in the EVENT! There were no Juniors, no Girls and virtually no spectators. That one store only had one brand on the racks: Sector 9, and back then Sector 9 didn't even have Downhill specific boards. I myself bought a 'Bomb Hills Not Countries' board, as it was stiff, nice and wide. The only trucks we could get were Randal RII's, and if you were really lucky and badass you had not the normal 50 deg baseplates, but you had the 42 deg ones. Too sick!! To paint an even clearer picture...the only decent wheels that you could get locally were Kryptonics (groms today won't even skate to the cafe on those). We had to wait till Hot Heels dawned for the internationals to come grace us with their presence, so we could buy their used, usually scrubbed old race wheels. We would ride that one set for the whole year till the next December when the internationals got back again. Needless to say kiff gear was unheard of.

Things slowly started picking up about the time I met up with the Cornerstone guys. I dragged them feet first into our obsession. Showed them what the scene was all about and what gear they should stock. Now it's not rocket science so they quickly figured it out for themselves and well, look at Cornerstone today. About that time too I was privileged enough to be able to import Orangatang wheels and sell off to my fellow Downhill junkies...this progressed to where it is today. Today I am a full on Distributor for Loaded/Orangatang/Paris and Riviera and Divine supplying skate stores all over SA.

Now all that being said I have not been part of the scene for half as long as some of us. But I have been around long enough to see where our scene came from and where it is going. What I would like to touch on this time round in this particular rant (yes there will be more) is this whole 'Sponsor me' business. Now this is aimed at riders and Brands/Manufacturers/Stores and freakin Online Stores alike.

Being sponsored is awesome yes, and you do get gear or race entries paid for. Some get sick leathers and some even get travel expenses covered. It's rad! You might even say that being sponsored helps you improve your skill as a skater and helps you realise your dreams. What the sponsors get out of it or is supposed to get out of it is exposure, exposure they get from you supplying them with being involved in the scene...riding, photo's, video's, organising events, being a role model, interviews, articles, reviews and sales. You know that sort of stuff, now I can promise you more than half the riders and even the sponsors don't understand what all that entails. This is where I get worried.

I see more and more kids getting sponsored and in all honesty why?! Why ride for a company when you don't even have the decency to actually ride their products? Why sponsor a rider if he is not riding your gear? Why ride for a sponsor if you don't believe in how they do business or you don't believe in their product? Why sponsor a rider if you are an online store on the opposite end of this planet!? Why ride for that online store? They are stealing business where they shouldn’t, you are supporting a company that is actively trying to destroy your local scene?! It doesn't make sense.

Being sponsored or sponsoring someone is like being in a relationship, you're not going to be involved with a girl that is a total bitch, that doesn't want to hang with your mates, that cheats on you, talks behind your back. No, you are going to be with someone who believes in you, you believe in them, you support each other and sometimes put in a little effort with. I honestly love my sponsors, and not because of the sick gear, that's a bonus. But because I believe in what they are trying to accomplish, I feel they have good intentions for the greater scene and they are rad people, and I can promise you they feel they same way about me.

There are so many sponsored riders now that companies feel that they have to get in on the sponsoring otherwise they are going to lose out somehow. The scene is a lot bigger yes, but don't fool yourself as it is still very, very small. If you sponsor everyone, who is left to buy your product?

Now I don't for a second think that our scene will stop growing, I am just wondering with all this selling of souls and companies not understanding and well riders taking companies for a ride, where is our scene going? It's not exactly as pure as it used to be...

Now put that in your pipe and smoke it.

Thanks for reading my rant, watch this space for more  

Raoul Has Lost It

Written by Raoul on .

Before I start rambling on, I think it would be best if I give you some background. So you can better understand where I am coming from.

I made Downhill skateboarding my passion the same year that I started racing. That was back in 2009, now it doesn't sound too long ago but if you talking in terms of Downhill skateboarding in South Africa, that is generations ago. When SA had only one store stocking Longboards, and Hot Heels Africa only had 20 something riders competing. That was in total, as in the EVENT! There were no Juniors, no Girls and virtually no spectators. That one store only had one brand on the racks: Sector 9, and back then Sector 9 didn't even have Downhill specific boards. I myself bought a 'Bomb Hills Not Countries' board, as it was stiff, nice and wide. The only trucks we could get were Randal RII's, and if you were really lucky and badass you had not the normal 50 deg baseplates, but you had the 42 deg ones. Too sick!! To paint an even clearer picture...the only decent wheels that you could get locally were Kryptonics (groms today won't even skate to the cafe on those). We had to wait till Hot Heels dawned for the internationals to come grace us with their presence, so we could buy their used, usually scrubbed old race wheels. We would ride that one set for the whole year till the next December when the internationals got back again. Needless to say kiff gear was unheard of.

Things slowly started picking up about the time I met up with the Cornerstone guys. I dragged them feet first into our obsession. Showed them what the scene was all about and what gear they should stock. Now it's not rocket science so they quickly figured it out for themselves and well, look at Cornerstone today. About that time too I was privileged enough to be able to import Orangatang wheels and sell off to my fellow Downhill junkies...this progressed to where it is today. Today I am a full on Distributor for Loaded/Orangatang/Paris and Riviera and Divine supplying skate stores all over SA.

Now all that being said I have not been part of the scene for half as long as some of us. But I have been around long enough to see where our scene came from and where it is going. What I would like to touch on this time round in this particular rant (yes there will be more) is this whole 'Sponsor me' business. Now this is aimed at riders and Brands/Manufacturers/Stores and freakin Online Stores alike.

Being sponsored is awesome yes, and you do get gear or race entries paid for. Some get sick leathers and some even get travel expenses covered. It's rad! You might even say that being sponsored helps you improve your skill as a skater and helps you realise your dreams. What the sponsors get out of it or is supposed to get out of it is exposure, exposure they get from you supplying them with being involved in the scene...riding, photo's, video's, organising events, being a role model, interviews, articles, reviews and sales. You know that sort of stuff, now I can promise you more than half the riders and even the sponsors don't understand what all that entails. This is where I get worried.

I see more and more kids getting sponsored and in all honesty why?! Why ride for a company when you don't even have the decency to actually ride their products? Why sponsor a rider if he is not riding your gear? Why ride for a sponsor if you don't believe in how they do business or you don't believe in their product? Why sponsor a rider if you are an online store on the opposite end of this planet!? Why ride for that online store? They are stealing business where they shouldn’t, you are supporting a company that is actively trying to destroy your local scene?! It doesn't make sense.

Being sponsored or sponsoring someone is like being in a relationship, you're not going to be involved with a girl that is a total bitch, that doesn't want to hang with your mates, that cheats on you, talks behind your back. No, you are going to be with someone who believes in you, you believe in them, you support each other and sometimes put in a little effort with. I honestly love my sponsors, and not because of the sick gear, that's a bonus. But because I believe in what they are trying to accomplish, I feel they have good intentions for the greater scene and they are rad people, and I can promise you they feel they same way about me.

There are so many sponsored riders now that companies feel that they have to get in on the sponsoring otherwise they are going to lose out somehow. The scene is a lot bigger yes, but don't fool yourself as it is still very, very small. If you sponsor everyone, who is left to buy your product?

Now I don't for a second think that our scene will stop growing, I am just wondering with all this selling of souls and companies not understanding and well riders taking companies for a ride, where is our scene going? It's not exactly as pure as it used to be...

Now put that in your pipe and smoke it.

Thanks for reading my rant, watch this space for more  

Cornerstone Video Contest June 2013- August 2013

Written by Jaques Van Jaarsveld on .

vid contest

 

So you not sure how to spend your June/July holiday? Cornerstone is hosting an awesome SA video contest this year!! You stand a chance to win a Loaded Tan Tien deck and a few other prizes from our sponsors: Gunslinger, FAT ANT, and Flat Out!!

You can follow all the hype on our Facebook Event Page to see the progress and sneak previews of the other prizes up for grabs.

So how to enter and what are the details?

Main Prize: Loaded Tan Tien Deck
And a few other surprise prizes for entrants.

Judges-
Cornerstone: 50% Votes
Facebook Likes: 20% Votes
Votes at video premier: 30% Votes

Video's to be handed in by the 21st July 2013 either at the Cornerstone  shop in the Neelsie, Stellenbosch or via Drop Box (link at the bottom)

Cornerstone will post all the videos on the Cornerstone like page on the 22nd July 2013 and then let the voting begin!!

Voting ends 31st July 2013

The videos will be premiered at the Pulp Cinema, Neelsie Centre, Stellenbosch where the final votes will be made by the spectators, tallied and then the prizes will be handed out to the winners.

Preliminary date for the premier is 10th August 2013

Details on the ticket sales will be released as soon as the premier dates are confirmed.

Rules and guidelines:

1) Cornerstone Logo to be added in the intro and a second Cornerstone logo to be added at a place of your choice which will get the Cornerstone Judges attention ;)
(Logo's can be found in the drop box.. link below)

2) Other Sponsors logos to be added in the video at least once. Proud sponsors of the Video contest are as follows: FAT ANT Bushings,  Flat Out and Gunslinger Longboards  (Logo's can be found in the drop box.. link below)

3) Adding a theme to your video will give you some brownie points eg. Cops and Robbers (get your own theme!! )

4) Please keep your video PG

5) Time allocated for videos: 1minute- 3:30 minutes

6) Video Quality needs to be at least 360p.

7) Hill etiquette (don't give away your secret spots like street names etc.)

Drop Box :  https://www.dropbox.com/sh/scrsan1lrzrxkd8/9IyW4W5FKz

2011 Cornerstone Slide Jam

Written by Raoul van den Berg on .

Photo’s by Melanie Fourie (Ultra-M photography)
and Alberto Pepler Photography

Cornerstone, a little shop with big dreams nestled in the middle of Stellenbosch. This little shop is playing a BIG role in the growth of our sport, the sport of Longboarding. The guys at Cornerstone are passionate and understand how passionate we are about Longboarding. So they went out of their way to host the first of many Cornerstone Slide Jams.

The Cornerstone Slide Jam was held on the first of October in Stellenbosch’s industrial area, Plankenbrug. A stretch of road not more than 200m long if I had to guess and unbelievably steep. 8am that morning we put 2 groms, Jeroen Slee and Paulu Joubert to work sweeping the road while we fetched something like 6 bakkies worth of tyres. We packed the tyres along side the road and at the bottom to catch stray boards or riders for that matter.

Shortly after Monster Energy rocked up and started assembling their chill zone and DJ stand. Yes, the slide jam even had a DJ! Soon after everyone one else arrived. Medics, Police, Sector 9 with even more shading and Michelle’s tuck shop. Michelle, wife of Cornerstone owner Deon had everything an over steezed skater could ask for, form cupcakes to pies. Between her and Monster handing out free energy drinks everyone was running on such sugar highs. I myself was bouncing up and down that hill all day long!

The event was scheduled to start at 14:00. But the registration ran so smoothly, thanks to Mia Esterhuizen, we decided to clear the road and let the urethane shredding commence.

Mega-Ramp

This was the first slide event in SA to see the MEGA RAMP! Well truth be told it wasn’t mega at all, but in longboard terms getting any kind of air is pretty gnarly man! An hour was allocated for the riders to practice and get comfortable.

Getting comfortable however was not to be so easy because at any given time there were at least 10 skaters on that narrow, steep hill. This put even the pro’s on edge, but made it so much more fun. It was crazy to see how the level of skating has grown and how Longboarding creates stoke amongst all ages, we’d see 13 year old kids ripping it up side by side with 40 year old veterans.

Grom-Shot

4 o’clock a few braved the Longest Stand up slide category, immediately 3 stood out from the rest. Mike Upham, Matt Arderne and Paul Du Plessis. These guys were pulling standy’s well over the 20 meter mark! It was a fine showcase of their skill…amazing to watch.

After all steeze was tapped out and the Monster Energy levels dropped, it was time for the prize giving. Deon parked his car next to the Monster stand, opened the boot and started handing out prizes. His car looked like a bottomless pit of goodies as it took almost an hour to get through prize giving. Everyone got goodies even the spectators!

Sticker-Slap

The Cornerstone Slide Jam was a huge success, the South African Downhill family is so thankful for Cornerstone’s involvement…we are curious and super excited to see what the future holds!

Photo Gallery

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